Tag Archives: Mexico

HAITI’S REALITY UNDER PAX MEXICANA.

This post is part of a series of upcoming post’s, which will focus on the serious, malaise of illicit drug trafficking and Transnational Trafficking Organizations (TCO’s) , and their corrupting, deadly influence throughout the Caribbean.

The Medellin cartel absorbed Haiti into the transnational illicit drug trade of the Caribbean island chain in the late 1960s and early 1970s. In the decade of the 1990s Haiti served the interests of the transnational drug trafficking organisations (TDTOs) that were in the process of turning Haiti’s neighbour into the illicit drug capital of the Caribbean island chain as a result operatives of these TDTOs became residents of Haiti some even became citizens establishing a new chic in the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere. 

Noted for their 7/11s, gas stations, cambios, armored Escalades, militias and luxurious houses built like bunkers many of which survived the 2010 earthquake. These resident traffickers during the closing years of the 1990s and the early years of the 21st century turned Haiti into an illicit drug trafficking Wild West with no Marshall Dillon. In February 2004 the TDTOs of the Dominican Republic in conjunction with their employees and associates in Haiti funded and armed a rebel militia which was assembled in the Dominican Republic (DR) which invaded Haiti and removed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide from power. 

The US, Canada, France and the UN hurriedly intervened into Haiti in the aftermath of the drug coup to place limits on the power of the employers of the militia that overthrew Aristide. That is why the drug financed militia continues to wield power in areas outside of Port-au -Prince especially in the rural areas. That is why up to today they patrol Haiti with MINUSTAH troops, they are absorbed into the Haitian National Police (HNP) and are awaiting recruitment into the new Haitian army that President Martelly is dead set on re-creating. The drug militia was never disarmed and dispersed by MINUSTAH and the US the shot caller in Haiti. In the aftermath of the 2004 drug coup one of the leaders of the drug militia Guy Philippe who was a presidential candidate in the first presidential election in the aftermath of the drug coup was indicted by the US for drug trafficking and on two occasion operations were launched by the US to rendition Philippe without success and he remains at large today. 

In the aftermath of the 2004 coup and the coming of Pax Mexicana to Haiti the reality in Haiti has changed dramatically as Haiti now has thriving retail and wholesale drug markets with all the attendant gun violence. In Haiti there is now political violence which was always endemic to Haiti that mixes with drug violence and gang violence. The Haitian state cannot respond to the volume of product that the Mexican cartels move through Haiti given the chronic underdevelopment of the Haitian state and economy. Whilst MINUSTAH is present in Haiti to suppress with force where necessary popular rebellion against a neo-liberal order that enhances chronic poverty. Likewise the shot caller in Haiti is not concerned with the hegemony of Pax Mexicana in Haiti being more interested in ensuring Haiti’s compliance with a neo-liberal order and subservience to the west. 

To accomplish this Aristide and the popular movement has to be politically neutered. The power wielded by the TDTOs in February 2004 in removing an elected President placed them at the table where Haiti is carved up and now the Mexican cartels are at the table. The order of the Mexican cartels in Haiti now involves Haitian gangland as affiliates and a Jamaican gangland presence in Haiti as Haiti is now linked to Jamaica as it is to the DR, Turks and Caicos Islands and The Bahamas. And in all of this the nations of the west involved in Haitian affairs simply don’t see nor act on this reality. Haiti is today a player in the order of Pax Mexicana.
http://www.sentinel.ht/news/articles/crime/5632-infamous-kidnapper-clifford-brandt-on-the-lam

http://www.sentinel.ht/politics/articles/judicial/5627-belizaire-issues-no-fly-order-against-aristide

http://www.sentinel.ht/news/articles/political/5629-martelly-continues-4-year-block-of-elections-political-parties

http://www.sentinel.ht/news/articles/education/5630-catastrophic-school-examination-results-prompts-call-for-reforms

Regular readers of this Blog, may have noticed that Iam cross posting certain post’s from Daurius Figueria . Figueria’s work complements mine, not to mention the fact that he is one of the very few, Caribbean authors with a nuanced scientific approach within his field of endeavor. He was relieved of his post as a professor and lecturer at the University of the West Indies (UWI), in Trinidad and Tobago. Figueria paid the ultimate cost for his anti-establishment writing and he is still writing his anti-establishment discourse. See his manifold qualifications and work history below.

His officia lwebsite here: http://www.daurius.com/

 Name: Daurius Figueira Position: Lecturer

Qualifications: BA (Hons), MPhil (UWI)Department: Behavioural SciencesRoom: Tel. Contact: Ext 2671E-mail: Daurius.Figueira@sta.uwi.eduCourses taught: CRMJ 6004 Terrorism and Political ViolenceSOCI 3010 Industrial Sociology 2: Sociology of Industrial RelationsSOCI 3029 Caribbean Social Structure 2Research interests: The illicit trades in the CaribbeanIslam and military engagement with the WestRace and racism in the politics of Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana geopolitics of energy in Trinidad and Tobago and VenezuelaPublications: Books
“Jihad in Trinidad and Tobago July 27th, 1990”
“The Al Qaeda Discourse of the Greater Kufr”

“Exiting a Racist Worldview a Journey through Foucault, Said, and Marx to Liberation”

“Simbhoonath Capildeo Father of Hindu Nationalism in Trinidad and Tobago”

“Cocaine and Heroin Trafficking in the Caribbean the case of Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and Guyana”
“Cocaine and Heroin Trafficking in the Caribbean Volume 2 the case of Venezuela, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic”
“Tubal Uriah Butler of Trinidad and Tobago Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana”

“The East Indian Problem in Trinidad and Tobago 1953-1961 Terror and Race War in Guyana1961-1964”

“The Politics of Racist Hegemony in Trinidad and Tobago”                       

OAS adopts resolution on protecting journalists.

OAS

St Peters Sint Maarten — The Organization of American States (OAS) has adopted a resolution on increasing protection for journalists and combating impunity for crimes against them. It is the first time that the OAS has passed a resolution on this crucial issue.

 

The resolution was adopted by the OAS general assembly meeting in the Mexican city of Cancún (June 19 -21). Regarded as part of the regional organization’s duty to promote and protect human rights, it also recognizes the importance of the work of journalists in the region.

 

The resolution is the result of an initiative by the office of Edison Lanza, the Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), and had the active support of such countries as Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, and Peru.

 

It calls on all OAS member states to:

 

– Condemn murders of journalists and take special measures to protect journalists and to prevent attacks against them.

 

– Combat impunity for crimes of violence against journalists by appointing special independent prosecutors, adopting specific protocols and methods for investigating and trying cases, and providing judicial officials with training on freedom of expression and the safety of journalists.

 

– Publicly reaffirm the right of every journalist to receive, seek and impart information without any form of discrimination.

 

– Encourage and reinforce member state cooperation with the IACHR and the special rapporteur’s office, especially on the issue of combatting impunity for crimes against journalists

 

“In view of the increase in violence against journalists throughout the Americas, we are very enthusiastic about this resolution’s adoption by the countries of the OAS and we share all of its recommendations,” said Emmanuel Colombié, the head of Reporters Without Borders (RSF) Latin America bureau.

 

“This resolution marks a new stage in the growing awareness of the western hemisphere’s governments of their responsibility to protect journalists and promote the work of the media,” he added.

 

The resolution stresses the fundamental importance of freedom of opinion and expression in development and reinforcing effective democratic systems. It also recognizes that journalists investigating stories involving human rights violations, organized crime, corruption and other kinds of serious illicit behaviour are often exposed to aggression and violence leading to self-censorship that deprives society of information in the public interest.

 

RSF said it shares this assessment and hopes that, although the resolution is not binding, governments will respect the undertaking they have given and will quickly implement the envisaged measures.