Category Archives: NGO

Research Training for Multi-Dimensional Poverty underway in the OECS.

Regional trainers develop skills to train others in research methodology

 

Tuesday, August 15, 2017 — Training seminars that build the capacity of public servants, and community representatives, in data collection on multidimensional poverty, are currently being held in select OECS Member States.

 

The OECS Commission, in collaboration with the United Nations Development Programme’s (UNDP) Sub-regional Office for the OECS and Barbados, is conducting Training of Trainer Workshops in Participatory Action Research on multi-dimensional poverty.

 

The initiative, which forms part of the Multi-dimensional Approaches to Poverty Eradication Project (MDAPP), has successfully completed training in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada, and Antigua and Barbuda. Additional training sessions are scheduled to continue in Dominica and St. Lucia in the weeks to come.

 

UNDP Project Coordinator at the OECS Commission, Dr. Julie Xavier, said the MDAPP intends to leave each project country with trainers who will be equipped with the skills to train others in the implementation of this research methodology. Participants were targeted from various social service ministries, as well as Departments of Statistics.

 

Project Coordinator at Grenada National Organisation of Women (GNOW) Ms. Jacqueline Pascal said that, despite her years of experience in the field as a researcher, the training highlighted areas for development.

 

“I have experience in doing research, both qualitative and quantitative, as well as interviewing techniques at the highest level. This gives a person a bit of complacency [with regards to] their knowledge base but, coming here, I have realized that I was on a learning curve as far as research is concerned,” Pascal said.

One participant from St. Vincent and the Grenadines commended the comprehensive nature of the new approach stating that “participatory action research encourages community participation and ensures that some specific action comes out of the research.”

 

Overall, the project is aimed at promoting greater awareness of the multi-dimensional nature of poverty through the development of policies and programmes that move away from the traditional focus income or employment, and underscore the importance of other dimensions of holistic human development such as experiences in health, housing, education, and feelings of safety and security.

 

The MDAP project is sponsored by the Government of Chile through the Agency for International Cooperation and Development (AGCID).

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OAS adopts resolution on protecting journalists.

OAS

St Peters Sint Maarten — The Organization of American States (OAS) has adopted a resolution on increasing protection for journalists and combating impunity for crimes against them. It is the first time that the OAS has passed a resolution on this crucial issue.

 

The resolution was adopted by the OAS general assembly meeting in the Mexican city of Cancún (June 19 -21). Regarded as part of the regional organization’s duty to promote and protect human rights, it also recognizes the importance of the work of journalists in the region.

 

The resolution is the result of an initiative by the office of Edison Lanza, the Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), and had the active support of such countries as Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, and Peru.

 

It calls on all OAS member states to:

 

– Condemn murders of journalists and take special measures to protect journalists and to prevent attacks against them.

 

– Combat impunity for crimes of violence against journalists by appointing special independent prosecutors, adopting specific protocols and methods for investigating and trying cases, and providing judicial officials with training on freedom of expression and the safety of journalists.

 

– Publicly reaffirm the right of every journalist to receive, seek and impart information without any form of discrimination.

 

– Encourage and reinforce member state cooperation with the IACHR and the special rapporteur’s office, especially on the issue of combatting impunity for crimes against journalists

 

“In view of the increase in violence against journalists throughout the Americas, we are very enthusiastic about this resolution’s adoption by the countries of the OAS and we share all of its recommendations,” said Emmanuel Colombié, the head of Reporters Without Borders (RSF) Latin America bureau.

 

“This resolution marks a new stage in the growing awareness of the western hemisphere’s governments of their responsibility to protect journalists and promote the work of the media,” he added.

 

The resolution stresses the fundamental importance of freedom of opinion and expression in development and reinforcing effective democratic systems. It also recognizes that journalists investigating stories involving human rights violations, organized crime, corruption and other kinds of serious illicit behaviour are often exposed to aggression and violence leading to self-censorship that deprives society of information in the public interest.

 

RSF said it shares this assessment and hopes that, although the resolution is not binding, governments will respect the undertaking they have given and will quickly implement the envisaged measures.

In Grenada, nutmeg heads up an economic revolution December 2, 2013.

World Bank

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

 

In the Eastern Caribbean, agriculture is one of the quickest industries for creating jobs and businesses.

Individual farmers with smallholdings are highly vulnerable to economic and climate shocks which threaten their livelihood.

Latin America and the Caribbean has huge potential to be a global food superpower in the coming decades.

Cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and ginger are often key baking ingredients. But on the island of Grenada they are also central ingredients in a burgeoning economic revolution.

 

The world’s second largest exporter of nutmeg, holding 20% of the market, this ‘Spice Island’ is now betting on agriculture to become an additional engine for an economy looking to diversify away from the usual sun and sand tourism and also shore up food security for its inhabitants.

 

While Latin America as a region is rich in water and arable lands (the region play’s home to around a third of the planet’s reserves), the small island nations of the Caribbean, such as Grenada and its neighbours, have to deal with the added challenge of a highly hostile climate, including hurricanes, severely limited freshwater supplies – which worsen further during the dry season – and a rising sea level.

 

Now smallhold farmers on this island paradise, situated some 200km off the Venezuelan coast, are leading an initiative to refocus Grenada’s economic profile with a project which has also caught the attention of other governments within the region.

 

Earnest Mitchell is just one of this next generation of local farmers.

 

“I’m thinking of doubling my production next year,” he explains with pride while showing us around his small farm perched high in Grenada’s fertile mountain region.

 

Earnest is one of 1,500 farmers who have taken part in a pilot project, which stands out thanks to its work “to identify our biggest challenges,” Earnest explains. This is no small feat on an island with a population of around 110 000, 70% of whom are considered to be rural. What’s more, the scheme is also opening the door to job creation on the island, where 40% of the active population is unemployed.

 

The farmers received technical assistance and financial support from the Japanese Social Development Fund and the World Bank to buy seeds, fertilizer, pesticides and tools. The crux of the project is, however, the possibility of protecting themselves from climate and economic shocks, and to better coordinate their production, especially after two consecutive hurricanes.

 

” I’m thinking of doubling my production next year. ”

Earnest Mitchell

Farmer, Grenada

Protection against natural disasters

 

While there is little farmers in Grenada can do against inclement weather in a region extremely exposed to natural phenomena, the project aims to alleviate potential economic, and also planning, havoc.

 

For example:  In 2004, Hurricane Ivan swept through the island, felling huge swathes of jungle along with many of the country’s valuable nutmeg, banana and cocoa plantations. A year later, Emily took much the same path, hampering efforts to rebuild the devastated farmlands and, above all, pushing the smallholders to respond, in desperation, with planting fruits and vegetables in an improvised manner.

 

Consequently the market has unwittingly been oversaturated by certain products while others suffer from a lack of supply, as the country experiences what experts call a cycle of over- and under-production.

 

Alongside limited water supplies and the impact of climate change, various Caribbean islands also suffer additional problems, and it is hoped that they can find a common solution.

 

“I think it’s going to be interesting to have a dialogue among all the OECS countries on this subject and see if we can do something in the future,” explains Eli Weiss, a rural development specialist for the World Bank.

 

For small hold farmers like Earnest, and their wider island community, it will be vital to protect themselves both from natural disasters and the damage they cause to their economies.

 

 

Soualiga Youth Manifesto.

Copyright © 1993-2009 Published by Berhanena Selam Press.

 

From the book by Wade Bailey; A Case for an independent Sint Maarten.

 

Copyrights: 2003-2008 ROSH MALKUTH PRODUCTS NAZARITE DESIGNS.

© Copyright: 2003, 2004, 2005,2006,2007,2008 Wade A Bailey (rights holder).

No quotations material written or drawn may be copied or transcribed using video or copying technology without the written permission of the publisher.

All infringements of the publisher’s copyrights are strictly prohibited.

Logo by ROSH MALKUTH PODUCTS NAZARITE DESIGNS.

Original Cover Design by Bernardo Bailey bka Ras Enoch, Illustrations by Bernardo Bailey and Wade Alexander Bailey.

Manufactured in Sint Maarten in The Caribbean African West Indies.

To contact the Publisher forward all correspondence to:

 

RMND/Berhanena Selam Press

Marigothill Road St Peters #18c

Sint Maarten.

Table of contents                                                                                       pages

 

Dedication

 

 

Quotes by several noted scholars black and white                                  2, 3

 

 

Foreword                                                                                                    4

 

Poem: Shards of my soul                                                                          6

 

Chapter 1: A history of Foundation Sualiga Youth                                         11

 

Chapter 2: Purpose for our Burden our Concern                                            48

 

Chapter 3:  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.                              76

 

Chapter 4:  What is the EU?                                                                               84

 

Chapter 5: The economy of Sint Maarten                                             104

 

Chapter 6: Who is a Sint Martener?                                                      106

 

Chapter 7: Towards the future                                                               108

 

Chapter 8: The ideology of independence in the Caribbean                113

 

 

 

“No people to whom liberty is given can hold it as

Firmly and wear it as grandly as those who wrench

Their liberty from the iron hand of the tyrant”

 

 

Frederick Douglas

 

 

 

Government is not infallible.  Government is only an                             executive control, a centralized authority for expressing the will of the people.

Before you have a government, you must have the people.

Without the people, there can be no government.  The government must be, therefore an expression of the will of the people.

 

 

Marcus Garvey

 

 

 

 

“No people to whom liberty is given can hold it as

Firmly and wear it as grandly as those who wrench

Their liberty from the iron hand of the tyrant”

 

 

Frederick Douglas

 

 

“That which thy fathers have bequeathed to thee earn it anew if thou wouldst possess it”

Goethe

“There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action”

 

Goethe

 

 

 

“He who does not understand the past is doomed to repeat it”

 

 

George Santayana

 

 

 

FOREWORD

 

“If Sint Maarten is to survive and evolve as a 21st-century competitor regionally as well as in the international sphere.

We will have to elect, to defend to the death the human rights of everyone in our midst as guaranteed in a democratically instituted constitution.

We must elect to be Sint Maarteners first and to defend Sint Maarten against all attempts to erode our Sovereignty, all of us will have to portray to the international community an unbroken oneness whether we are Africans in the Diaspora, Europeans or whatever  ethnicity one lays claim to, all of us will have to be a true Sint Maartener”

“True power is the ability to transcend force by persuading the people of a society both common and elite to work in tandem with the leader in pursuit of common goals and interests”

The world has now moved into a phase called globalization, on a scale undreamt of by the masses sixty years ago although visionaries foresaw this future, it is still awe-inspiring and marvelous in the sheer scope of its endless possibilities.

Space travel is common even space tourism is a reality today; Nanotechnology has changed the scope of technological advances forever.

The internet is a massive globalizing tool it has given most of the world’s population and I particular vast swaths of the so-called Third World an equalizing tool of leverage.

Even today on Sint Maarten we have this wonderful technology which affords virtually every household an opportunity to increase their quality of life overnight.

That many are not aware of the actual scope of the awesome power in their living rooms is due sadly to lack of education, while many purchase the technology for their children.

This will soon change the world of today is digitized and interactive as the world becomes more digital, everyone will have to participate willingly or unwillingly.

The need for certain types of labor will be rendered obsolete in the not to distant future, persons who are not technology savvy will simply not be able to function optimally in this new world.

All jobs will require a certain amount of technical know how we are moving increasingly into a more knowledge-intensive economy.

The knowledge economy is one in which people will become increasingly technology conscious, education will be geared more towards developing a workforce that is integrated and self-regulating, collectivism will be increasingly the norm.

Sint Maarten will have to adjust to this new world in all fields of human endeavor.

Since Sint Maarten will not be able to mass produce technology all small economies will begin to select their brightest students and finance their studies in technology-intensive fields bringing them back home will not be a question it will be a fact of life without their expertise no economy will function.

As we all know the world’s economy is interconnected and interdependent . This will increasingly become a fact of life. The International Standards Organization ISO, is already implementing a policy globally that will ensure products developed anywhere in the world will all be priced exactly the same .

This will ensure a truly level playing field, the policy is already being carried out a quick look at the back of most appliances, especially those coming out of Asia will reveal the ISO seal of approval.

National sovereignty of most nations will be increasingly eroded, where does such developments leave islands in the Caribbean region; it leaves them at the mercy of much larger economies.

The Caribbean region will in fact have to form blocks purely out of a common need for survival the regional entity known as Caricom will gain real relevance purely out of a common regional realization, that unity in the global market translates to strength.

The isolationist game that the so-called Netherlands Antilles played  is an Achilles heel in this 21st-century global society.

Snubbing our Caribbean brothers and depending solely on tourism and European aid will not sustain the island any longer.  As the ambitions of the population changes to reflect global trends. Funds from a variety of sources will ensue, soon Sint Maarten will learn that one can ill afford not to join with the rest of the Caribbean, as European political interests will cater more to Europe,   leaving the island to fend for itself.

Given our present reality we would do well to begin to deal with facts and dispose of the idea that persons will continue to come to the region in the future in the numbers that they do today.

As was previously stated tourism globally is already taking on a diverse character China is developing its vast cultural resources to cater to Western tourists. India is also delving into cultural tourism, terrorism and financial crises are also changing the direction tourists will choose to go.

In a world where terrorism, is an all-encompassing very real threat, tourists will choose destinations where their safety can be guaranteed, of course this will never be one hundred percent.

The expertise that Italy and Greece have in dealing with a terrorist threat, surpasses the combined expertise of every Caribbean island in that area. The region is not prepared for a worst case scenario.

The coup in Trinidad by the Jamaat Al Muslimeen, should serve as a warning to all, that the region is not immune to such.

However, the opportunity for a regional prosperity is greater than ever before. I’m positively optimistic that the region will rise to the occasion and many of our Caribbean sister islands, will emerge as leaders in the region.

 

SHARDS OF MY SOUL.

This is not a poem these are shards of my soul a soul at once torn and complete two faces of good and evil melancholic yet joyful look with your soul eyes as the man bares his essence.

Love and innocence lost this is an ode to love to bonding to roses.

To the female flower her Tulip her Pomegranate, her Bejeweled Goblet, her feminine repose her waterfall her shower of beauty.

I seek for love like a thirsty man in a desert twice eluded once found, when found contained in a bosom jealously guarded.

It was exquisite not sensual never erotic it remained pure likened to that of a virgin.

An untouched unspoilt virgin she shone brightly in my mind’s eye.

I reached to touch the vision she vanished, I cried out in anguish as if I were a child again and my mother left me I winsomely sought the unspoilt virgin but she was not her captors took her, she was deceived with trinkets and fake gold.

One her captors is called slavery, the other is mammon the other is called whoredoms, next is vice, followed by Neo-Colonialism, racism fathered them all, their mother western imperialism and their father birthed a child called tourism, this child brought with it great wealth and illusions of grandeur.

Riding with the child called tourism was death, with tourism came death and destruction.

The children ceased to be productive, they became cannibals and began to eat the flesh of their offspring.

The children were sacrificed on the altar of greed to Moloch god of poverty.

What a paradox such a dichotomy the children were sacrificed for wealth but their betrayers yet remain poor poverty of the soul the worst kind that afflicts mankind the betrayers of the children cannot think for themselves they are to dumb to even run their own house .

Some of the children escaped the demon called Moloch, the old man called them the “Joshua Generation”.

He said these escaped children would one day free the others who are mentally dead their spirits are strong and their souls want to be free.

He said there is an enemy within not on the outside he cautioned the Sheppard Boy to look for the enemy within he it is who will bring about destruction.

I said how will I know him and what is he called , he intoned look in the water I gazed at my own reflection beneath me, he said the image that you see is your enemy defeat him and all his weaknesses and you will be free.

I laughed old man how can I defeat my self?  He retorted all that is wicked all that is bad in your own heart destroy it and then you will know why I appear in your dreams.

He said the whore who sacrificed her own babies, another is holding her basket.

The old man laughed at the fools he said the Brahmin is controlling the greedy old whore he has the money that she wants, he laughed ha, ha, ha, he chortled mockingly as he jeered at their utter stupidity.

Hes said the colonial masters are not the masters anymore the Brahmin have the purse strings in his hand.

The old man was black he stood upright, tall and willowy his beard was white, I said who are you, he said Iam the spirit of prophecy Iam called a prophet.

I said what about the children with power and force in his voice he said “You shall live and not die” I asked about the once unspoilt queen, now an old whore I asked of her place and her whereabouts I pondered and I sought to know her name in the vision of enrapturing beauty the unspoilt queen, stood tall and proud the vision that I so covetously sought was no more it all vanished like a cloud and in her place was an old bedraggled colonized whore the old man in the vision said this former queen now whore’ name is miss Sint Maarten .

“ Her children are scattered to the four winds sacrificed on the altar of greed and he lamented the lost of innocence, as for me I only wanted the pleasure of knowing the virgin not the pain that came with the realization of her true nature.

This is the essence of mankind love and innocence, pain, pleasure and redemption and at the apex of all things the whirlwind the summation of life will.

Sint Maarten awaits her whirlwind will she reap what she has sown? The old man replied only time will tell.

New Picture (6)

The true desire of the conscious and enlightened Sint Maartener an Independent Sint Maarten. (Qualichie/Soualiga=Land of Salt.) Ancient Arawak name given to the island by its indigenous inhabitants.

This symbol which is portrayed on the front cover of this book is again reproduced here and the symbology deciphered.

The white bird is a national symbol of the island namely the Brown Pelican a relic of the time of the great salt ponds this creature is endangered today by the pollution of its natural habitat.

The man with the sword represents the African sons of Sint Maarten, the man standing next to him is an Arawak his robe is purple symbolizing kingship the Arawak was an indigenous inhabitant preceding the African as an inhabitant of Sint Maarten. Although many Africans brought to the islands were in fact royalty this illustration portrays the African and the birth of his freedom on Sint Maarten the Genesis of a new era.

The Independence flag flies proudly above their heads the African woman at the left of the illustration depicts the female mother of the island and the male child represents the shared hope of both parents for a male heir who can procreate and carry on the legacy of independence and peace that they have established .

The female child is representative of the ability of the female to birth new life and ideas into a culture the Arawak mother proudly bares her progeny in her arms. The two families are symbolic of indigenous peoples and our ability to create new symbols and our adaptive nature in adapting even slave symbols and making them a positive mark of identification in the recording of our shared history.

Alkebulan the continent misnomered Africa shows the origin of all humanity and is the place from whence the Black man claims his descent.

 

 

Will be continued.